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publicly that assad of syria has to go. that was a choice that he made. one would assume that declaring it publicly involves a commitment by the united states which the united states is prepared then to make effective. and that, therefore, we have the means and the strategy for achieving that objective. it soon turned out that this was a rhetorical commitment without a real capacity for follow through on our part. so we went to the u.n., and we demanded that the u.n. security council support us on this. not surprisingly, the russians and the chinese said, well, we don't share this conclusion, and we're not going to join you in forcing assad out, and we object, and the resolution failed. we thereupon denounced the russians and chinese as having engaged in a stance that is infantile and disgusting, those were the words used by our ambassador to the u.n. which is not a way of soliciting their support for further -- [laughter] further common policy. on top of it, it became increasingly clear that the opposition to assad is very mixed. some of it involves some of our friends who are sponsori
, president bashar al-assad and his associates are resorting increasingly with other indiscriminate capabilities that terrorize innocent syrians and increase further the flow of refugees out of syria. former secretary panetta discussed the possibility of more robust options for military support last year. and he agreed to bring this matter to his counterparts in brussels. the recent decisions by the french and the british that provided assistance directly to the syrian opposition suggests that the position and nato is by no means unified. admiral come i hope you will provide us with some concept of our current thinking compared to that of our european partnerships, as it relates to syria and possible additional roles for the alliance beyond the deployment. eucom responsibilities include managing military engagement and cooperation, including through the nato and russia council. this includes russia's cooperation with the coalition equipment out of afghanistan, along the northern distribution network through russia and over 110 military to military activities between our two militari
whether our policy is right. it's not too early to know how history will judge assad. that's easy. but in terms of whether or not we have proceeded in a more deliberate way than some would want us to, and probably a little more than i would want us to if you want to get into that, nonetheless the goal here is to make sure that what happens after assad is, is stable, is diverse, is not chaotic. that the right people are the ones that take over when assad goes. and that's, that's a matter of putting in place, if possible, a kind of an interim political coalition, which will have broad support inside of syria, which will not see a long period of retribution and violence following the fall of assad which will happen. and putting that in place to the extent that's possible is what is going on now. at the same time, supporting the opposition, at least those elements of the opposition which we believe are positive, constructive, progressive elements, but that are not the extreme element that otherwise could turn syria into a, if possible, hard to imagine, even, worst case, than is with a
important >> the u.s. ambassador to syria also discuss the allegations that the assad regime used chemical weapons. here is part of his testimony ao a house foreign affairs committee hearing. >> so far, we have no evidence to substantiate the reports that chemical weapons were used yesterday.emic but i want to underline that we are looking very carefullyea atd these reports. we are consulting with partners in the region and in the international community. more broadly, we have been very clear from the beginning about our concern that as the assad regime's military situation deteriorates and it becomes asrs the director of national intelligence said, it becomes ever more beleaguered, that it might be tempted to use chemicav weapons m. the president has been very clear in saying that if assad and those under his command makn the mistake of using chemical weaponsen or if they fail to met their obligation to secure them, then there will be consequenceso and they will be heldcu accountable.re >> what with those consequences be ? accountable. >> what would those consequences be, ambassador? >> m
. goodbye. >> its estimated 70,000 people have died since the start of protest against president assad in syria. today, house foreign affairs committee examines the student civil war and his from u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford. live coverage starts at 9:25 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> the federal open market committee is meeting this week on monetary policy. federal reserve chairman ben bernanke will hold a news conference to talk about the economy and fed policy. you can see it live this afternoon starting at 2:30 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we could take pictures of the brain with mri scans or ct scans and see the whole thing, but there's this enormous gap in between about how the circuits of the brain functions in order to be able to move my hand, or to look at you and process that information, or to lay down a member. we don't know how that works. with technologies yet to be invented, so a lot of this will be technology development and a lot of it will be nanotechnology. what we need to be do is to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time. and b
is having some strategic distress over, you know, the, you know, the king of the assad regime. more relaxed about that just as more relaxed about egypt and in syria i find a much more limited sort of agenda than i would have thought going in much, instead of believing the u.s. will somehow reorder the middle east to israel's liking i find this is sober kind of a summit, what is doable and what is not doable. a lot of stuff about the new israeli government which i'm happy to discuss in the q&a. this gives you a bit of a sense how you see things. thank you all very much. >> thank you, dave. very good. turn to mike singh. >> thanks a lot, rob. good to be doing this and it's, good to be on this panel with my colleagues. one of the great strengths about the washington institute and one of the things which makes it so nice to work here is to have colleagues like david and dennis and ambassador jeffrey who are here and great source of wisdom on this topic. i should also start by apologizing to our viewers who have hd screens who had to watch me eat lunch at the beginning. one of the downsides of t
with our allies to address these threats that have developed while bashar al-assad remains in power. and to begin the important planning to address the challenges that will come with his fall, such as how best to secure chemical weapon stockpiles. none of these threats or challenges can be addressed with simple, easy answers but i fully support america working with prime minister netanyahu and king abdullah to craft a regional strategy that serves all of our national interests. mr. president, i yield the floor. ms. ayotte: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new hampshire. ms. ayotte: thank you, mr. president. i rise today to discuss something of deep importance to me, and i believe to our country. last night, there -- ms. mikulski: mr. president, not to object, what is the parliamentary situation? are we in a quorum call? the presiding officer: we are not in a quorum call. ms. mikulski: are not? the presiding officer: are not. ms. ayotte: thank you. last night, the majority leader of the senate came to the floor and on the continuing resolution, which is essentia
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)